Cool Great Depression images

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A few nice great depression images I found:

The Bridge the CCC Built
great depression
Image by kafkan
Civilian Conservation Corps ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civilian_Conservation_Corps )

The CCC was a program started by FDR during the Great Depression to give employment to young men to help them support their families.

They would join for 6 month periods and live in camps which would travel around the country doing domestic construction work. They built many roads and bridges. They were especially active around National and state parks (they paved the road into Palo Duro Canyon and built all the stone picknik and restroom buildings).

They were also responsible for many of the older road side rest areas. They also built some of the facilities in older city parks. You can almost always tell their work by the use of large pieces of native stone in public buildings.

The WPA ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Works_Progress_Administration )was another New Deal work program, but it employed anyone needing work and was not exclusive to younger men. At one time it was the largest employer in the country. Their projects were much the same as the CCC. Many brick streets were laid by the WPA.

An interesting branch of the WPA was the PWAP (Public Works of Art Project)( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PWAP ). It employed artists from around the country to pait murals in public buildings. There are several murals in the Amarillo Federal Building that were painted by the PWAP ( www.wpamurals.com/texas.html ). There were many artists who worked for the PWAP and some of them went on to be pretty famous ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WPA_artists ).

Mt. Holyoke, Massachusetts – Scenes. West Boylston Manufacturing Company, 1936
great depression
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Mt. Holyoke, Massachusetts – Scenes. West Boylston Manufacturing Company, 1936

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 69-RP-67

Photographer: Hine, Lewis

Subjects:
The New Deal
Tennessee Valley Authority
Works Progress Administration
Work Portraits
The Great Depression

Persistent URL: research.archives.gov/description/518356

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Bread line
great depression
Image by spatwei
I’ve been meaning to shoot this scene of the Great Depression’s bread lines at the Roosevelt Memorial, especially considering the economic woes of the country. The dusting of snow Wednesday morning gave me a good reason to stop by before work.

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10 Responses to “Cool Great Depression images”

  1. NeOHippy94

    WHO is the CCC? this is a awesome shot! way cool!

  2. kafkan

    Civilian Conservation Corps ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civilian_Conservation_Corps )

    The CCC was a program started by FDR during the Great Depression to give employment to young men to help them support their families.

    They would join for 6 month periods and live in camps which would travel around the country doing domestic construction work. They built many roads and bridges. They were especially active around National and state parks (they paved the road into Palo Duro Canyon and built all the stone picknik and restroom buildings).

    They were also responsible for many of the older road side rest areas. They also built some of the facilities in older city parks. You can almost always tell their work by the use of large pieces of native stone in public buildings.

    The WPA ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Works_Progress_Administration )was another New Deal work program, but it employed anyone needing work and was not exclusive to younger men. At one time it was the largest employer in the country. Their projects were much the same as the CCC. Many brick streets were laid by the WPA.

    An interesting branch of the WPA was the PWAP (Public Works of Art Project)( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PWAP ). It employed artists from around the country to pait murals in public buildings. There are several murals in the Amarillo Federal Building that were painted by the PWAP ( http://www.wpamurals.com/texas.html ). There were many artists who worked for the PWAP and some of them went on to be pretty famous ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WPA_artists ).

  3. Jasperdo

    Hi, I’m an admin for a group called CCC Architecture, and we’d love to have this added to the group!

  4. lreed76

    Hi, I’m an admin for a group called New Deal Legacy, and we’d love to have this added to the group!

  5. GuyB v3.0
  6. **la_strada_dei_sogni**

    looking great..

  7. Lisa{santacrewsgirl}

    lovely to meet you ;o))
    You’ve been tagged!
    Rules:

    1. sit down.
    2. take a picture of yourself right now. don’t primp, just snap one!
    3. upload it.
    4. tag 5 people to do the same.

  8. scott185 (the original)

    I visited the Roosevelt Memorial at night shortly after it opened. This section had a pensive, depressed sense. I know we are in a bad economic time right now, but it still does not come close to the dispair of the Great Depression.

  9. spatwei

    Agreed, Scott. The figures in that section look rather destitute. Hopefully things today won’t get nearly as bad as it was during that period.

  10. k.calamur

    great picture and nice capture!