Mt. Holyoke, Massachusetts – Paper. American Writing Paper Co. Rag sorting (Irish), 1936

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A few nice great depression images I found:

Mt. Holyoke, Massachusetts – Paper. American Writing Paper Co. Rag sorting (Irish), 1936
great depression
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Mt. Holyoke, Massachusetts – Paper. American Writing Paper Co. Rag sorting (Irish), 1936

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 69-RP-47

Photographer: Hine, Lewis

Subjects:
The New Deal
Tennessee Valley Authority
Works Progress Administration
Work Portraits
The Great Depression

Persistent URL: research.archives.gov/description/518336

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

FAIRHOPE, LOUISIANA …item 2.. Letters to the editor — Higher education isn’t for everyone — No wonder the herd on Wall Street is so inarticulate (November 3, 2011) …
great depression
Image by marsmet552
Bouke-White and Caldwell saw the South as feudalistic, as did other critics of the system of sharecropping. The revealing phrase ‘my workers’may be heard in factory and downtown office building as well as at the end of the cotton rows ," wrote Arthur F. Raper and Ira De A. Reid in their 1941 work, Sharecroppers All (v).
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…….***** All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ……
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…..item 1A)…. White Folk

xroads.virginia.edu/~CLASS/am485_98/coe/whitefolk.html

Looking at matters like "low wages, insecurity, and lack of opportunity for self-direction and responsible participation in community affairs," they defined a sharecropper as one who "shares in the risk without sharing in the control," including many non-farm workers (Raper vi).
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…..item 1B)…..Photographing the Representative American:

Margaret Bourke-White in the Depression

xroads.virginia.edu/~CLASS/am485_98/coe/photofrnt.html

The title is You Have Seen Their Faces," said Skinny. "How do you like it?"

The name implied just what I had been searching for as I worked.
Faces that would express what we wanted to tell. Not just the
unusual or striking face, but the face that would
speak out the message from the printed page
(Sternsher 117)

Travelling across the American South with writer Erskine Caldwell (Tobacco Road) between 1935 and 1937, Margaret Bourke-White photographed the people of the Depression. Of course she was not the only photographer to document the Great Depression-there were other big names, like Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, Russell Lee; there were Ben Shahn, Marion Post Wolcott, Arthur Rothstein, and others, as well as countless uncredited Farm Security Administration photographers. Their images remain powerfully with us still.

These images define the Great Depression.

Why are there so many photographs of the depression, and why are they so defining? Who was Margaret Bourke-White? And what is distinctive about the ways in which she photographed the Depression? How did she define "the face that would speak out the message from the printed page," the representative American?
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…..item 2)…. Tallahassee Democrat Newspaper … www.tallahassee.com … Letters to the editor … Higher education isn’t for everyone

FILED UNDER
Opinion
Letters

Nov. 3, 2011

www.tallahassee.com/article/20111104/OPINION02/111030334/...

Re: "Professor: students are ill-prepared for science" (letter, Nov. 3).

I commend Professor Walter R. Tschinkel for his letter, which gives credence to the sad truth that what passes for education in this country now is but a shadow of its former state. When I graduated from Florida State University in 1963, I felt that I had a passable education, but when compared to that of my parents’ peers it was lacking. Like so much else in our culture, we have thrown billions of dollars into a system that can barely teach youngsters to read, much less think critically or deeper than "like, you know, it kinda sucks."

My education was so much better than what is offered today that I am amazed it even goes by the same name. No wonder the herd on Wall Street is so inarticulate and given to such inane slogans. Until we face facts that not every child is equally intelligent or motivated and direct such students into vocational education and concentrate higher education on those capable few who want and can withstand the rigors of a difficult curriculum, we have to give up dreams of a better America. Imagine, we sent the astronauts to the moon using slide rules. No one today even knows how to use one and would be lost without a computer to solve mathematical problems. Amen, Walter.

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YVONNE RICHARDSON

yrich44@comcast.net

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