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More Cuba, Dec 2011 – 049
prepare for collapse
Image by Ed Yourdon
The same apartment building as in the previous photo; and a pedicab in the foreground…

This is a second set of a couple hundred photos taken in Havana, Cuba in December 2011. The first set, which included what I felt were the best 100 photos of the 3500+ images, was uploaded earlier. You can find it here on Flickr.

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As I suggested in my first set of Cuba photos on Flickr, the notion of traveling to Cuba is — at least for many Americans today — probably like that of traveling to North Korea. It’s off-limits, forbidden by the government — and frankly, why would anyone bother? But for someone like me, who spent his childhood in the Cold War era of the 1950s, and who went off to college just after Castro took power, and just before the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban missile crisis, the notion of traveling to Cuba has entirely different overtones.

And yet Cuba is only 90 miles away from Key West (as we were reminded so often in the 1960s), and its climate is presumably no different than a dozen of Caribbean islands I’ve visited over the years. Numerous friends have made quasi-legal trips to Cuba over the years, flying in from Canada or Mexico, and they’ve all returned with fabulous pictures and great stories of a vibrant, colorful country. So, when the folks at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops sent out a notice in November 2011, announcing a series of photo workshops in Havana, we couldn’t resist the temptation to sign up.

Getting into Cuba turned out to be trivial: an overnight stay in Miami, a 45-minute chartered flight operated by American Airlines, and customs/immigration formalities that turned out to be cursory or non-existent. By mid-afternoon, our group was checked into the Parque Central Hotel in downtown Havana — where the rooms were spacious, the service was friendly, the food was reasonably tasty, the rum was delicious, and the Internet was … well, slow and expensive.

We had been warned that that some of our American conveniences — like credit cards — would not be available, and we were prepared for a fairly spartan week. But no matter how prepared we might have been intellectually, it takes a while to adjust to a land with no Skype, no Blackberry service, no iPhone service, no phone-based Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. I was perfectly happy that there were no Burger Kings, no Pizza Huts, no Wendys, no Starbuck’s, and MacDonalds. There was Coke (classic), but no Diet Coke (or Coke Light). There were also no police sirens, no ambulance sirens, and no church bells. There were no iPods, and consequently no evidence of people plugged into their music via the thin white earplugs that Apple supplies with their devices. No iPads, no Kindles, no Nooks, no … well, you get the picture. (It’s also worth noting that, with U.S. tourists now beginning to enter the country in larger numbers, Cuba seems to be on the cusp of a "modern" invasion; if I come back here in a couple years, I fully expect to see Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets on every corner.)

But there were lots of friendly people in Havana, crowding the streets, peering out of windows and doorways, laughing and shouting and waving at friends and strangers alike. Everyone was well-dressed in clean clothes (the evidence of which could be seen in the endless lines of clothing hanging from laundry lines strung from wall to wall, everywhere); but there were no designer jeans, no fancy shoes, no heavy jewelry, and no sign of ostentatious clothing of any kind. Like some other developing countries, the people were sometimes a little too friendly — constantly offering a taxi ride, a pedicab ride, a small exchange of the "official" currency (convertible pesos, or "cuqs") for the "local" currency (pesos), a great meal or a great drink at a nearby restaurant or bar, a haircut, a manicure, or just a little … umm, well, friendship (offers for which ran the gamut of "señor" to "amigo" to "my friend"). On the street, you often felt you were in the land of the hustle; but if you smiled, shook your head, and politely said, "no," people generally smiled and back off.

As for the photography: well, I was in one of three different workshop groups, each of which had roughly a dozen participants. The three dozen individual photographers were well equipped with all of the latest Nikon and Canon gear, and they generally focused on a handful of subjects: buildings and architecture, ballet practice sessions, cockfights, boxing matches, rodeos, fishing villages, old cars, interiors of people’s homes, street scenes, and people. Lots of people. As in every other part of the world I’ve visited, the people were the most interesting. We saw young and old, men and women, boisterous children, grizzled elders, police officers, bus drivers, and people of almost every conceivable race.

The streets were clean, though not spotless; and the streets were jammed, with bicycles and motorbikes and pedi-cabs, taxis, buses, horse-and-carriages, pedestrians, dogs (lots of dogs, many sleeping peacefully in the middle of a sidewalk), and even a few people on roller skates. And, as anyone who has seen photos of Havana knows, there were lots and lots and LOTS of old cars. Plymouths, Pontiacs, Dodges, Buicks, and Chevys, along with the occasional Cadillac. A few were old and rusted, but most had been renovated, repaired, and repainted — often in garishly bright colors from every spectrum of the rainbow. Cherry pink, fire-engine red, Sunkist orange, lime green, turquoise and every shade of blue, orange, brown, and a lot more that I’ve probably forgotten. All of us in the photo workshop succumbed to the temptation to photograph the cars when we first arrived … but they were everywhere, every day, wherever we went, and eventually we all suffered from sensory overload. (For what it’s worth, one of our workshop colleagues had visited Cuba eight years ago, and told us that at the time, there were only old cars in sight; now roughly half of the cars are more-or-less modern Kia’s, Audis, Russian Ladas, and other "generic" compact cars.)

The one thing I wasn’t prepared for in Havana was the sense of decay: almost no modern buildings, no skyscrapers, and very little evidence of renovation. There were several monstrous, ugly, vintage-1950s buildings that oozed "Russia" from every pore. But the rest of the buildings date back to the 40s, the 30s, the 20s, or even the turn of the last century. Some were crumbling, some were just facades; some showed evidence of the kind of salt-water erosion that one sees near the ocean. But many simply looked old and decrepit, with peeling paint and broken stones, like the run-down buildings in whatever slum you’re familiar with in North America. One has a very strong sense of a city that was vibrant and beautiful all during the last half of the 19th century, and the first half of the 20th century — and then time stopped dead in its tracks.

Why that happened, and what’s being done about it, is something I didn’t have a chance to explore; there was a general reluctance to discuss politics in great detail. Some of Havana looks like the less-prosperous regions of other Caribbean towns; and some of it is presumably the direct and/or indirect result of a half-century of U.S. embargo. But some of it seems to be the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and the subsequent collapse of foreign aid that Cuba depended upon.

As for my own photos: I did not attend the ballet practice sessions, nor did I see the rodeo. I did see some interesting graffiti on a few walls, which I photographed; but for some reason, I missed almost all of the numerous political billboards and stylized paintings of Che Guevera on buildings and walls. What I focused on instead was the "street scenes" of people and buildings and cars, which will hopefully give you a sense of what the place is like.

Enjoy!

100 views of Cuba, Dec 2011 – 04
prepare for collapse
Image by Ed Yourdon
This set consists of what I felt were the best 100 photos of the 3500+ images that I took in Cuba during a weeklong visit in December 2011.

I often photographed cars as they drove past me, or as they turned a corner to go from one street to the next. On this occasion, I was also interested in photographing a line of school children that were being marched along the street … and I was slightly intrigued by the presence of some graffitti on the wall..

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Cuba. For today’s generation of Americans, the notion of traveling to Cuba is probably like that of traveling to North Korea. It’s off-limits, forbidden by the government — and frankly, why would anyone bother? But for someone like me, who spent his childhood in the Cold War era of the 1950s, and who went off to college just after Castro took power, and just before the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban missile crisis, the notion of traveling to Cuba has entirely different overtones.
And yet Cuba is only 90 miles away from Key West (as we were reminded so often in the 1960s), and its climate is presumably no different than a dozen of Caribbean islands I’ve visited over the years. Numerous friends have made quasi-legal trips to Cuba over the years, flying in from Canada or Mexico, and they’ve all returned with fabulous pictures and great stories of a vibrant, colorful country. So, when the folks at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops sent out a notice in November 2011, announcing a series of photo workshops in Havana, we couldn’t resist the temptation to sign up.

Getting into Cuba turned out to be trivial: an overnight stay in Miami, a 45-minute chartered flight operated by American Airlines, and customs/immigration formalities that turned out to be cursory or non-existent. By mid-afternoon, our group was checked into the Parque Central Hotel in downtown Havana — where the rooms were spacious, the service was friendly, the food was reasonably tasty, the rum was delicious, and the Internet was … well, slow and expensive.

We had been warned that that some of our American conveniences — like credit cards — would not be available, and we were prepared for a fairly spartan week. But no matter how prepared we might have been intellectually, it takes a while to adjust to a land with no Skype, no Blackberry service, no iPhone service, no phone-based Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. I was perfectly happy that there were no Burger Kings, no Pizza Huts, no Wendys, no Starbuck’s, and MacDonalds. There was Coke (classic), but no Diet Coke (or Coke Light). There were also no police sirens, no ambulance sirens, and no church bells. There were no iPods, and consequently no evidence of people plugged into their music via the thin white earplugs that Apple supplies with their devices. No iPads, no Kindles, no Nooks, no … well, you get the picture. (It’s also worth noting that, with U.S. tourists now beginning to enter the country in larger numbers, Cuba seems to be on the cusp of a "modern" invasion; if I come back here in a couple years, I full expect to see Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets on every corner.)

But there were lots of friendly people in Havana, crowding the streets, peering out of windows and doorways, laughing and shouting and waving at friends and strangers alike. Everyone was well-dressed in clean clothes (the evidence of which could be seen in the endless lines of clothing hanging from laundry lines strung from wall to wall, everywhere); but there were no designer jeans, no fancy shoes, no heavy jewelry, and no sign of ostentatious clothing of any kind. Like some other developing countries, the people were sometimes a little too friendly — constantly offering a taxi ride, a pedicab ride, a small exchange of the "official" currency (convertible pesos, or "cuqs") for the "local" currency (pesos), a great meal or a great drink at a nearby restaurant or bar, a haircut, a manicure, or just a little … umm, well, friendship (offers for which ran the gamut of "señor" to "amigo" to "my friend"). On the street, you often felt you were in the land of the hustle; but if you smiled, shook your head, and politely said, "no," people generally smiled and back off.

As for the photography: well, I was in one of three different workshop groups, each of which had roughly a dozen participants. The three dozen individual photographers were well equipped with all of the latest Nikon and Canon gear, and they generally focused on a handful of subjects: buildings and architecture, ballet practice sessions, cockfights, boxing matches, rodeos, fishing villages, old cars, interiors of people’s homes, street scenes, and people. Lots of people. As in every other part of the world I’ve visited, the people were the most interesting. We saw young and old, men and women, boisterous children, grizzled elders, police officers, bus drivers, and people of almost every conceivable race.

The streets were clean, though not spotless; and the streets were jammed, with bicycles and motorbikes and pedi-cabs, taxis, buses, horse-and-carriages, pedestrians, dogs (LOTS of dogs, many sleeping peacefully in the middle of a sidewalk), and even a few people on roller skates. And, as anyone who has seen photos of Havana knows, there were lots and lots and LOTS of old cars. Plymouths, Pontiacs, Dodges, Buicks, and Chevys, along with the occasional Cadillac. A few were old and rusted, but most had been renovated, repaired, and repainted — often in garishly bright colors from every spectrum of the rainbow. Cherry pink, fire-engine red, Sunkist orange, lime green, turquoise and every shade of blue, orange, brown, and a lot more that I’ve probably forgotten. All of us in the photo workshop succumbed to the temptation to photograph the cars when we first arrived … but they were everywhere, every day, wherever we went, and eventually we all suffered from sensory overload. (For what it’s worth, one of our workshop colleagues had visited Cuba eight years ago, and told us that at the time, there were only old cars in sight; now roughly half of the cars are more-or-less modern Kia’s Audis, Russian Ladas, and other "generic" compact cars.)

The one thing I wasn’t prepared for in Havana was the sense of decay: almost no modern buildings, no skyscrapers, and very little evidence of renovation. There were several monstrous, ugly, vintage-1950s buildings that oozed "Russia" from every pore. But the rest of the buildings date back to the 40s, the 30s, the 20s, or even the turn of the last century. Some were crumbling, some were just facades; some showed evidence of the kind of salt-water erosion that one sees near the ocean. But many simply looked old and decrepit, with peeling paint and broken stones, like the run-down buildings in whatever slum you’re familiar with in North America. One has a very strong sense of a city that was vibrant and beautiful all during the last half of the 19th century, and the first half of the 20th century — and then time stopped dead in its tracks.

Why that happened, and what’s being done about it, is something I didn’t have a chance to explore; there was a general reluctance to discuss politics in great detail. Some of Havana looks like the less-prosperous regions of other Caribbean towns; and some of it is presumably the direct and/or indirect result of a half-century of U.S. embargo. But some of it seems to be the result of the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, and the subsequent collapse of foreign aid that Cuba depended upon.

As for my own photos: I did not attend the ballet practice sessions, nor did I see the rodeo. I did see some interesting graffiti on a few walls, which I photographed; but for some reason, I missed almost all of the numerous political billboards and stylized paintings of Che Guevera on buildings and walls. What I focused on instead was the "street scenes" of people and buildings, which will hopefully give you a sense of what the place is like.

Enjoy!

‘getting it done right’ …item 4.. Woman, 41, ’causes ,000 of damage after helping middle school daughter vandalize a neighbor’s home – ‘Could I help you?’ (18 September 2012) …
prepare for collapse
Image by marsmet526
Tara Mauney, 41, allegedly purchased 108 rolls of toilet paper for the caper and lead the group of students to put raw chicken in the mailbox, a toilet on the front lawn and graffiti on the home, causing ,000 worth of damage.
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…….***** All images are copyrighted by their respective authors ……..
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… message header for WCTV News

But even with the cleaner conditions neighbor’s aren’t satisfied. They want the dogs gone. They say they’ve had enough of of the constant barking and smells coming from the home, where Animal Control says more than 50 dogs live.
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…..Read Comments…..****** eight (8) comments listed below ******

Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.

—by Wide Rd. on Feb 9, 2012 at 01:54 PM
Where is our Southside Commissioner?? Mr. Proctor, care to come do your job? His answer would be NO!! We are not his preferred constituents.

—by MissionStatement Location: county on Feb 8, 2012 at 05:12 PM
Animal Control Division Richard Ziegler, Director Animal Control Protecting Leon County’s Animals & Citizens Mission Statement: Improve animal and human well-being through education, prevention, and enforcement programs and humane animal care and control services for the citizens and animals of Leon County. DOES IT LOOK LIKE HE IS LIVING UP TO THE MISSION STATEMENT….NO.

—by Nice mugshot on Feb 7, 2012 at 09:53 AM
h t t p://florida.arrests.org/Arrests/Christine_Winckelmann_3487363/

—by TOLD YA SO Location: WIDE RD on Feb 7, 2012 at 01:42 AM
THANK YOU ANIMAL CONTROL [OFFICERS ONLY] FOR NOT GIVING UP ON US THROUGH THE YEARS NOT YOU RICHARD ZIG YOU ARE A SCUM BAG LIAR AND AN ANIMAL ABUSER TO FOR ALLOWING THIS TO GO ON FOR 12 YRS OF OUR COMPLAINTS .CHRIS !!! CHRIS !!!! TOLD YA SO !!!

—by BURR Location: wide road on Feb 6, 2012 at 11:34 PM
In response to "dont hate the dogs" Yes we have spoken with her and she is very unapproachable and will cuss at you and has flipped us off driving down the road. Shes not a nice lady thats rescuing dogs. Shes a bitter lonely woman with no regards for others or her many dogs as the pictures clearly showed tonite.

—by another viewer Location: tlh on Feb 6, 2012 at 11:23 PM
Yes, she works for the Fire Dept., no she is NOT at all what is normal for them. She is in the process of suing them yet again. Trust me, they would love to be rid of her! As for the dogs, I love dogs, all dogs, but hers have been neglected for years. She has 2 homes, one of hers and one that was left to her by her mother. The dogs have taken over so badly that they are digging under the foundation and it is on the verge of collapse. Her poor child is neglected and yet she still gets away with keeping him by staying just on the right side of the line. Someone PLEASE rescue these animals and the kid! She is in serious need of mental help!!!!

—by enough is enough on Feb 4, 2012 at 07:42 PM
for over a decade Winkelmann has been breeding dogs, she would place ads in the paper selling the husky/hound mix pups. i havent seen her advertise any of the pups for sale in a few years. she did not adopt a dog from the shelter EVER! she doesn’t rescue, she let them breed. this is a case of a few dogs allowed to breed for 10 yrs and producing offspring. and dont blame the evil shelter for her irresponsibility. she’s been offered several vouchers to get her dogs fixed for years. which she refused to do. and now here we are. a decade and nearly a hundred dogs later…

—-by Anonymous on Feb 3, 2012 at 06:35 AM
there is a nuisance law in leon county that can be enforced if the LCSO wants to,i lived in Tallahasee and had a neighbor that had 7 dogs and they would keep us up all night from the barking so we called LCSO and they came out numereous times and the person ended up getting some tickets.

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…..item 1)…. WCTV NEWS … www.wctv.tvwww.wctv.tv/home/headlines

Posted: 10:35 PM Feb 9, 2012

Animal Control Returns to Wide Road Property
Animal control officers say owner making progress, will return for another inspection next week

Reporter: Mike Springer. Julie Montanaro
Email Address: michael.springer@wctv.tv
[UPDATE] Neighbors Tire of Barking Dogs
Neighbors Tire of Barking Dogs

UPDATE — February 9

Animal control was back at Christine Winckelmann’s property this afternoon. They inspected the grounds for several hours. And while they say she has made progress, there’s still more work to be done.

Pens full of feces. Dirty water. Multiple dogs to a cage.
These were the conditions of Christine Winckelmann’s property last week, as seen here in photos given to WCTV by a confidential source.
Animal Control inspected the Wide Road property last Thursday. and cited Winckelmann for several violations.

"There was a considerable amount of feces around the kennels," says Richard Ziegler, director of Leon County Animal Control.

Winckelmann was given seven days to clean up. Ziegler returned for a follow up inspection. He checked the grounds for more than two hours.

"All the buckets of been cleaned. Scrubbed out. Clean food. But some of the kennels still need to be cleaned up from the matter," says Ziegler.

But even with the cleaner conditions neighbor’s aren’t satisfied. They want the dogs gone. They say they’ve had enough of of the constant barking and smells coming from the home, where Animal Control says more than 50 dogs live.

"She’s cleaning the kennels up finally, but what’s going to happen now is everybody thinks everybody is going to back off of it and it’s and it’s going to happen again. We have got to hear this and smell this all the time," says Ward Waff, a neighbor.

Off camera, Winckelmann told wctv she cares for the dogs the best she can. She says she is not a dog hoarder. Just someone who loves dogs. Winckelmann says she does not want any of the dogs end up at the pound and euthanized.

Winckelmann was issued two citations. One for failure to comply. The second for creating a public nuisance. She will be required to appear before a judge. And could pay up to 0 dollars per fine.

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UPDATE — February 9

Animal control officers returned to a Woodville home today and ordered the owner of dozens of dogs to continue cleaning up their kennels.

Neighbors complained about constant barking and the smell of feces coming from the corner lot. Animal control inspected her property for 2 1/2 hours and have cited her for more cleanup.

Atlhough, she has provided fresh water and cleaned up some feces, animal control says there is still work to do. The citation requires her to appear in court, where she can face a fine of 500 dollars.
Animal Control will re-inspect next week.

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UPDATED 2.9.2012 by Julie Montanaro

We talked to the dogs’ owner today.

Christine Winckelmann says she cares for the dogs to the best of her ability.

She says she is not a dog hoarder, but a dog lover and does not want any of the dogs to wind up at the pound to be euthanized.

"It makes me sad that so many of my neighbors have such animosity toward me," she said. "I am constantly cleaning and trying to keep up with my responsibilities."
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UPDATED Feb. 8 2012 2:39 p.m.

Animal Control will return Thursday to inspect a Wide Road property, according to its director. The property has more than 50 dogs living on it and excess feces and tainted water.

Animal Control Officers went out to the property out Feb. 2 after neighbors called about excessive barking and a loose dog. Animal Control inspected the property. And violations were found. Animal Control said it would return Wednesday for a followup inspection. But that has been rescheduled for Thursday.

Richard Ziegler, director of Leon County Animal Control says the ordinance gives the owner seven days to comply. And he says Wednesday would be six days. One short of the requirement. Ziegler says he will inspect the property himself Thursday afternoon.

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UPDATED Feb. 6 2012 11:37 p.m.

Law enforcement officers have now given a Leon County woman an ultimatum in a case of a possible hoarding situation.

The property, owned by Christine Winckelmann, has more than 50 dogs in what many believe are poor conditions. WCTV recently obtained photos from a confidential source of the property owned by Winckelmann. To view photos, click on the "Photos" tab above

Carol Zorn has lived next to the property for years.

"You can’t hardly even stand to be out there because of the smell," said Zorn.

We showed her the pictures of what’s happening over the fence next to her. Photos show dogs living four to a cage next to piles of feces and water buckets that have turned brown.

"I thought through all the years that it might kind of look like that but I’ve never been over there."

Leon County officials were at the property Friday to inspect the area.

Animal Control Director Richard Ziegler, who witnessed the property first-hand, says something needs to change. We showed him these photos.

"The water, like the water here dark and stuff that’s one of the things that we addressed," Ziegler said. "Removing all the feces and stuff like that so yes that is some of the things that we are going to, she’s supposed to take care of."

Ziegler has given Winckelmann an ultimatum. She has until this Wednesday to clean the property up before Leon County Sheriff’s deputies step in.

"There’s a process that the ordinance allows us to follow and that’s what we’re looking at."

Ziegler didn’t rule out animal being taken away from the property.

Zorn says she’s finally hopeful that a solution will be found for both the animals Winckelmann.

Stay with WCTV for updates

____________________________________

Leon County, FL — February 3, 2012 —

A Leon County ordinance limits the numbers of pets you can own.

Animal Control arrived at a home on Wide Road Thursday. Neighbors had complained about excessive barking. Animal Control says more than 50 dogs live at the home there. Owners of more than 31 cats and dogs need a permit. But only if they’re guilty of two violations in a two year period.

While the owner does not have a permit, She has not been found guilty of two or more violations either. The ordinance took effect in October for Leon County.

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Leon County, FL — February 2, 2012 —

Neighbors on Wide Road in Leon County say they’ve had enough of the smells and constant barking coming from one of the homes there.

"It’s just pure misery living next across the street from this lady," says David McCranie, a neighbor.

Neighbors on Wide Road say they’ve been dealing with this for years.The constant barking and the smells are coming from this home neighbors say is overrun by dogs.

"The smell, constantly everyday, especially when it rains, the noise the little beeper she’s got over there that tries to keep the dogs quiet," says Brandon McCranie.

Animal Control Officers responded to the repeated complaints and went to the home of Christine Winckelmann.

"They heard some dogs barking or acting aggressive with themselves inside and were concerned about the welfare of the dogs," says Richard Ziegler of Leon County Animal Control.

They inspected the property. But there was no evidence of any abuse of neglect of the more than 50 dogs animal control says are living on the property.

"A lot of the animals look really good. There’s water. Food buckets were empty, but the person just got home," says Ziegler.

Animal Control did issue to two citations to Winckelmann for barking dogs. But neighbors say they want to see more done.

"I’d like to see these dogs out of here. They’re not people friendly," says Brandon McCranie.

Animal Control says Winckelmann has been cited before for loose dogs and inhumane care. Winckelmann declined to comment.

Winckelmann will head to civil court to handle the citations. A court date has not been set at this time.

Latest Comments

Posted by: schwarz on Feb 10, 2012 at 06:54 PM

leon county nor any other county is held to what some non profit defines any act
Posted by: Another Neighbor Location: Wide Road on Feb 10, 2012 at 05:58 PM

Yesterday, Mr. Z was asked the number of dogs on Winkelmans property…(at one point there was close to 100 dogs on her property)…Mr. Z indicated that they had not yet come up w/a total number and told us that he would call us and let us know….so Mr. Z….how many dogs does this hoarder have on her property? We’re awaiting your call!
Posted by: Anonymous on Feb 10, 2012 at 05:47 PM

Don’t believe everything how it is reported. WCTV syas "Animal Control" states OVER 50, but try like double that, almost 100.

Click here to post or read all 233 comments.
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…..item 2)…. Florida Arrests .org …. florida.arrests.org

FLORIDA MUGSHOTS

florida.arrests.org/Arrests/Christine_Winckelmann_3487363/

Christine Winckelmann … 5-18-2003
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…..item 3)….. Leon County Property Apprasier … Parcel ID : 461015 B0140

Bert Hartsfield, CFA

www.leonpa.org/ACCT.CFM?ACCOUNT=461015++B0140

Owner(s) : WINCKELMANN CHRISTINE L
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…..item 4)…. Mail Online … Daily Mail … www.dailymail.co.uk/news

Woman, 41, ’causes ,000 of damage after helping middle school daughter vandalize a neighbor’s home with raw chicken, feminine products and peanut butter’

… Jodie Rishel’s Texas home was vandalized early July 25th by a group of her daughter’s classmates, who caused ,000 in damages
… The girls chased the pranksters down the street to the home of Tara Mauney, 41, who has been charged with felony criminal mischief
… Upon investigation, police officers found footage of Mauney at WalMart earlier that night, purchasing 108 rolls of toilet paper with a group of eight middle schoolers

By EMILY ANNE EPSTEIN
PUBLISHED: 15:20 EST, 18 September 2012 | UPDATED: 15:47 EST, 18 September 2012

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2205232/Woman-41-causes-…

A suburban Dallas mother has been charged with felony criminal mischief after she allegedly helped middle school student boys prank their classmates’ slumber party.

Tara Mauney, 41, allegedly purchased 108 rolls of toilet paper for the caper and lead the group of students to put raw chicken in the mailbox, a toilet on the front lawn and graffiti on the home, causing ,000 worth of damage.
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img code photo … Tara Mauney, 41

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/09/18/article-2205232-1514E3…

Charged: Tara Mauney, 41, allegedly purchased 108 rolls of toilet paper for the caper

Police Handout

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When the pranksters were spotted by the slumber party girls, they chased them to the home of Mauney, who they recognized from school functions, though her attorneys have denied any and all claims against her.

According to an affidavit acquired by MailOnline, officers arrived at Jodie Rishel’s home early July 25 to find the entire residence covered in toilet paper.

They found raw chicken stuffed inside the mailbox and a toilet placed in the center of the driveway in front of the home with the words ‘suck it’ written in permanent marker on it.

‘[The Officer] also observed that written on the light colored exterior stucco walls of the home, in the covered drive area, were numerous writings, such as "whore house", "CMS jokes", "suck it", and "sluts" in black "sharpie" style ink. "Sluts" was written on the circle driveway in what appeared to be mustard, which had dried,’ the arrest compliant read.

More…

…Salmonella sandwich? Patron bites into ‘RAW chicken burger’ at KFC eatery in Canada
…Women’s eyesight damaged by Brooklyn rave’s ‘toxic’ glow-in-the-dark pool
…Cocaine binges at the office and sex orgies: Woman falsely accuses dermatologist ex-husband of outrageous medical fraud (but now he’s won a 0,000 settlement)

Peanut butter was smeared on the pillars of the driveway and tampons and other sanitary napkins – soaked in ketchup – were stuck on the front windows of the home.

Mrs Rishel said that she was hosting her 12-year-old daughter’s friends for a pool party and slumber party that evening when they observed a male looking over the back fence at the festivities.

Scroll down for video
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img code photo … Tara Mauney, 41

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/09/18/article-2205232-1514E3…

Neighborly? She allegedly lead the group of students to put raw chicken in the mailbox, a toilet on the front lawn and graffiti on the home of her neighbor, causing ,000 worth of damage

Police Handout

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img code photo … Tara Mauney, 41

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/09/18/article-2205232-1514E3…

Neighborly? She allegedly lead the group of students to put raw chicken in the mailbox, a toilet on the front lawn and graffiti on the home of her neighbor, causing ,000 worth of damage

Police Handout

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The girls chased after the boy, who fled with a group of children they recognized from school, to the home of Tara Mauney, a few blocks away.

Mauney, who the girls recognized from school functions, allegedly stopped outside of her home and asked the girls ‘Could I help you?’

‘You can clean up the mess you just made,’ one of the girls responded, according to police.

Police were called as well as the girls parents, which is when one of the girls’ mothers remembered that she had seen Mauney shopping at the local WalMart at 10:30 pm that evening, with eight middle school aged children.

Security footage of the store revealed Mauney ‘chaperoning’ a group of three boys and five girls posing for a photograph inside the store before they purchased three 36-roll packages of toilet paper.
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img code photo …

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/09/18/article-2205232-1514E3…

Vandalized: When the pranksters were spotted by by the slumber party girls, they chased them to the home of Mauney, who they recognized from school functions, though her attorneys have denied any and all claims against her

Photo credit: Google
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img code photo … Home of Tara Mauney / Home of Jodie Rishel

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/09/18/article-2205232-151516…

Red-Handed? Mauney, who the girls recognized from school functions, allegedly stopped outside of her home and asked the girls ‘Could I help you?’

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Police say the group struck another home that night as well.

Mauney, who is free on ,500 bail, faces a maximum of two years in jail and a ,000 fine for the deeds.

When reached Monday by the Star-Telegram, Mauney declined to comment other than to say that ‘the kids have retracted some statements.’

Her attorney, Brian Willett, says that Mauney denies the charges and is prepared to take a polygraph test.
‘She was never at that place,’ Mr Willett said Monday. ‘They are saying that she did the writing, but she wasn’t there.’

Two boys who allegedly took part in the prank have come forward to police to confess their actions. Mauney has been the only one charged so far and is scheduled to appear in court next week.
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